World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI)

March 3, 2011

Creative Curriculum Development and Practice

Guest Editor: Jessie A. Roderick

Contents

Acknowledgments ………………………………………………………… v

Section I. Introduction

Guest Editor’s Comments …………………………………………………. 3
J. Roderick

Conference Opening Remarks ………………………………………………. 8
P. van Stapele

Greetings from Hiroshima ………………………………………………… 9
S. Takemura

Opening Address ………………………………………………………… 10
M. Andela-Bauer

Greetings ……………………………………………………………… 12
R. Gorter
F. Winkel

Presidential Address:
Perspectives, Paradigms, and Personal Creativity in Organizational

Responsibility: What Next? ……………………………………………….. 14
N. Overly

Section 2. Plenary Session Presentations

The Immortal Robinson or Whether Creativity can be Educated ………………….. 27
L. Dasberg

Creative Curriculum Development and Practice ……………………………….. 37
E. Eisner

Stages of Growth to Global Personhood: A Paradigm for Orchestrating

A Future for WCCI ……………………………………………………….. 49
E. Nicholas

Section 3. The Poetry of Curriculum

CREATIVE: From Word to Acronym …………………………………………… 57
T. Swee-Hin

Curriculum Planned and Lived —A Vedic Perspective …………………………… 58
S. Ahlawat

A Poetry of Curriculum …………………………………………………… 64
N. Haggerson

Creative Curriculum: The Mythological Roots ………………………………… 70
K. Berry

Common Threads Between Humour and Peace Education …………………………… 77
C. Leeds

Translating Values into Action ……………………………………………. 86
A. M. Golden

Section 4. Curriculum Practice: Examples and Instances

Creative Education: A Paper Reality? ………………………………………. 91
J. Chaurasia

A Distance Education for Bangladesh ……………………………………….. 97
G. Shah

Turning Students on to Science ……………………………………………. 103
T. Liem

From Where You Are: Three Perspectives …………………………………….. 109
L. Jasik

Creative and Mastery Learning: A Curricular View ……………………………. 115
F. Mina and S. Mohamed

A Modular Approach to Curriculum Development:

Theory Into Practice …………………………………………………….. 119
A.Carl

The Similarities in the Receptions of Teacher Training

Programs in St. Lawrence, New York and Szeged, Hungary ………………………. 127
S. Klein and K. Farkas

Abstracts

Education for All: Eradication of Illiteracy, Provision and

Improvement of the Quality of Universal Primary Education …………………….. 137
S. Takemura

Practices of Peace Education in Hiroshima …………………………………… 138
H. Morishita

Death Education for Young Children …………………………………………. 139
E. Ishigaki

Section 5: Curriculum for Whom?

Drama and Development in Kenya: The Children Speak …………………………… 143
W. Kironyo and L. Dijkema

Rural Adults’ Perceptions of Child Abuse: Implications for

Parent Education Curriculum ……………………………………………….. 147
E. Maduewesi

Approaches to Developing Creative Curriculum in the South

Pacific Islands: A Cross-Cultural View ……………………………………… 154
B. Fox

Counseling for Change in Stereo-type Sex Roles in the

Indian Context …………………………………………………………… 160
G. Unnithan

Section 6: Reflections on the Process of Curriculum Development

Approaches to Creative Curriculum Development ……………………………….. 169
L. Berman and J. Roderick

The Closed and Open Contract: Two Irreconcilable Structures

In Curriculum ……………………………………………………………. 176
N. Garman

WCCI: A Context for Creative Curriculum Development and Practice ………………. 183
P. van Stapele

Interest Group Reports ……………………………………………………. 189

Conference Participants …………………………………………………… 205